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Pirate News
Francois l'Olonais, The Bane of Spain

Some pirates have a reputation for malevolence and savagery, but none have warranted the reputation more than the legendary scallywag known as Francois l'Olonnais, the Scourge of the Spanish! Much of Arrr Information about l'Olonnais (Pronounced Low-Low-Nay) is gathered from Alexander Exquemlin's Accounts n' can be taken with a hefty grain of salt, yet there is such detail!

For much of his life, l'Olonnais was an indentured servant when he arrived in the Caribbean sometime in the 1650's. Indentured Servants were one step above slaves in the New World, being bound to harsh working conditions by a binding contract. People in Europe could be kidnapped and sold into Indentured Servitude. The major difference would be that there was a theoretical end to the contract with a reward upon conclusion. It was banned by the United Nations alongside Slavery in 1948.

l'Olonais completed his contract by 1660 n' promptly made way to Haiti where he became a Buccaneer. A few years into his career he and his mates shipwrecked off the coast of Campeche, Mexico where they were massacred by the Spanish Army. l'Olonnais only survived by hiding among the dead. With the help of Spanish slaves he escaped to Tortuga, only to return later with a thirst for vengeance.

He and his crew promptly took settlements hostage, to which the Spanish responded with military force. l'Ollonais beheaded all but one of the men sent against him, whom he told to spread a message, "I shall never henceforward give quarter to any Spaniard whatsoever."


In 1666, he sailed to Maracaibo, Venezuela with a crew of 440 Pirates to sack the city with great success. To gather information about hidden valuables, l'Olonais flayed his victims, burned them alive, or squeezed them to death by strapping them tightly to a mast.

After several years of increasingly larger feats of piracy, l'Olonais wrecked his ship on an expedition to Honduras, only to allegedly be devoured by cannibalistic natives! http://bit.ly/2lRL7nb

The Mardi Gras Pirate Wench

Mardi Gras Pirates n' Wenches! All be welcome! Ye will be the Saucy Queen of New Orleans with an outfit such as this! Resplendent in Green, Purple n Gold, laden with doubloons n' treasures!

This be the perfect time to go all out with yar outfit! Costumes are abundant at Mardi Gras Celebrations, historically speakin' they allowed carnival goers to escape the bonds of social class, identities and their associated constraints. Be who ye want to be this holiday! Especially if that be a pirate! http://bit.ly/2kXP2u1

Pirates in the Gulf and Tampa Bay

Piracy has had a profound impact on the culture of Tampa Bay. We have adopted them as arrr sports team mascot, we created the Legendary Jose Gaspar- around which the annual Gasparilla Pirate Festival has arisen. Tampa also be home to Pirate Fashions- Home to the World's Largest Selection of Pirate Plunder n' Riches!


We want to elaborate on how n' why pirates have left such a strong impression on the Bay Area. In the early 19th Century there was a very influential pirate captain (later a privateer) named Jean Lafitte that operated in the Gulf of Mexico. Lafitte and his family mostly operated out of Louisiana Allegedly he had a subordinate Pirate Captain that operated out of the islands near Tampa Bay named Henry Ross. Lafitte n' his pirates ran a very successful smuggling ring in the Gulf o' Mexico. And if the stories are accurate he may have held sway in the Bay Area.


Jean Lafitte became a privateer during the War of 1812 when he helped Andrew Jackson fend off the British in the Battle of New Orleans, it is believed to be the final Battle of the War.


In Tampa's first public graveyard, visitors can also find the grave stones of two men identified as Mid-19th Century Cuban Pirates. Jose "El Indio" Perfino and Captain Hubbard. Though their origins be shrouded in mystery, the Tampa Locals are believed to have hung El Indio. It is unknown how Hubbard met his end.


Jose Gaspar is widely accepted as a Mythical figure, but we have been celebrating his legend annually with Gasparilla since 1904. It is believed that he is based off of a Portuguese Seaman n Teller of Tall Tales named John Gomez- who operated along the Gulf Coast in the late 19th Century. Myth suggests that Gomez was part of Gaspar's pirate crew.
Today of course, we celebrate Gasparilla with arrr own Legendary Pirate Invasion, as of 2015 it is the third largest parade in the United States. Strike yar colors, drink some rum and revel in the Piratical Culture o' Tampa Bay! Learn more: http://bit.ly/2jzHFYG